Back to Home

LIPIPUSPA NAYAK
(Orissa)


Lipipuspa Nayak  is a Lecturer in English. She is a critic and translator. Translates from Oriya into English. She has four publications (translations of Oriya literary texts into English) and two films to her credit. Credited with translation of Chatura Binod, the 18th century prose classic into English. Teaches English at a college near Bhubanswar. She is also associated with Central Sahitya Academi New Delhi for translation work. Apart from several other assignments, she is, currently preparing an anthology of contemporary Oriya Literature for Kafla Inter-continental which is likely to be published in 2007.
Address: C/o Prof Dr R.B.Nayak, Lane- I, VIP Road, Bhadrak- 756100, Orissa.)
Phone : 094371-69543  Email :


God-Demon: the Speech of the Subaltern
by
Lipipuspa Nayak

This paper talks about ecological devastation as the most tragic and disturbing reality of Post-Colonialism. The paper cites God-Demon, a play by Hrusikesh Panda from Orissa, (English version of original Oriya Brahmarakshas, published by Sahitya Academi, New Delhi, 2007) to substantiate the point. Irrevocable loss of flora and fauna of lands invaded by the Colonial masters has been a disquieting actuality of the Post-Colonial time. God-Demon documents this reality unequivocally. In the play God-Demon, the eponymous protagonist represents the archetypal aborigine who is displaced from his abode by the king, the Colonizer. The destruction of wild flora and fauna, and ancient civilizations by the Colonialists has been mentioned as a matter of fact. The native God-Demon, after offering land, food and company to the royalty, the Colonizers, starves as his food falls victim to the royal whim of hunting games. His woods disappear as the king expands his landmass by felling trees, only to assert his monarchical arrogance. In this limitless stretch of insensitivity and insanity, the fury of the God-demon fails to hold; his wisdom and austerity fail him completely. He withdraws to a self-banishment, which is not possible anymore in a forestless land. But yes, his hurt is so human, that it sensitizes the audience on the ways civilizations behave, and mankind acquires its ultimate fate in the fight between civilizations.
Let me quote a speech by Brahmarakshas (the god-demon) in the play to complement my discourse:
Brahmarakshas: Refugee, ha? To defile you came. If that were all, then it would not have been excessive. It is not of today or of yesterday; it is of years and years. Your crime is far more horrendous. Listen! You kill birds and animals. You are not just brutally violent. You are blind with arrogance too. You snatched away my food and destroyed it… if one brushes one’s teeth twice a day, stems will have to be cut twice a day for use a s brushing sticks. It will hurt the trees, and the equilibrium of the universe will be affected. Therefore, though I am a demon, I brush my teeth only once a day. But when you built your palace, you waste out ten times timber quality trees you use. Only out of arrogance. To build machans for hunting, you cut down trees, for the sake of your arrogance…you felled down trees to build traps for wild elephants, only for the sake of your arrogance… To conquer countries, you made bows and arrows, and spears, and cut down trees for this. You wanted to have more subjects and to fulfill their requirements for habitable land you cut down more trees. You filled your treasury with the money earned from ......................


Back to Home